TOM'S SCIENCE & INVENTIVE CHAT BOARD

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Thu 10 Aug 2017 07:32:16
Name :df
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Hi guys I decided to check out how you guys are doing.

I read that stuff about teleporting through quantum mechanical means. At this point in time there is almost no way to guess future course of the tech to be associated with it. To presume to have an expensive plan is smoke and mirrors. It's felt that to link large massive objects would require epic amounts of energy. Maybe a culture that could harness the total power of it's sun would be in that ballpark. We are a long ways from that level of tech. Those cultures are travelling the stars. I'm still chasing the ice cream truck down the street.

Small things like photons are obviously a different story. Furthermore there are all sorts of other kinds of entanglement.

As for the use of the word "teleporting" it's worth noting that things that are entangled actually are sharing a common location in some way. That's why things seem to happen instantly. They are instant! There is no distance involved as far as whatever type of entanglement is in action.

I can further elaborate on this if anyone cares. I will say that it is much simpler and easy to understand than most people would think.
Wed 05 Jul 2017 05:26:13
Name :THOMAS MCKAY 52
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NICE TIME ON THE PHONE WITH HANK.HAPPY




Thu 04 May 2017 09:58:34
Name :Tom McKay 1952
Email :mckay_thomas@att.net
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About FORCE. At my age all I know about force about now ...is that of women, who sure nuff have the FORCE much more years then we men with withering testosterone. Ha, Have a happy
Sun 12 Mar 2017 01:38:53
Name :WRT
Email :pi
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How can the force win when the object didn't move?
Mon 27 Feb 2017 10:45:00
Name :to: pi
Email :Unstoppable force vs immovable object
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How about;

Nuclear bomb vs granite mountain?

Sat 25 Feb 2017 04:09:06
Name :pi
Email :
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rethinking..the force wins 100x over
Sat 25 Feb 2017 04:07:43
Name :pi
Email :
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What is the power of the force and what is the lb. of the object and what is the size, weight of the individual you want to stop? Can I have the math equation for this..give me that and I won't need the other stuff.
Sat 25 Feb 2017 04:07:42
Name :pi
Email :
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What is the power of the force and what is the lb. of the object and what is the size, weight of the individual you want to stop? Can I have the math equation for this..give me that and I won't need the other stuff.
Thu 29 Dec 2016 05:32:58
Name :Henry
Email :huh?
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Tom, you big galoot, what the heck are you talking about.

Wed 28 Dec 2016 06:45:25
Name :Tom 52
Email :100 million birds
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Hank, We need to raise a lot of $$$$$$ and send you back to school. 100 million birds??? Shoot, I am the biology and education major...You will be higher and higher if we can pull this deal off. What a happy
Wed 28 Dec 2016 06:39:12
Name :Tom McKay
Email :mckay_thomas@att.net
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Henry,Darn exciting news about Mars. I am looking up this HAPPY. MANY THANKS AND LOVE AT YA
Wed 31 Aug 2016 08:34:58
Name :Henry
Email :3.7-billion-year-old fossil makes life on Mars less of a long shot
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http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/37-billion-year-old-fossil-makes-life-on-mars-less-of-a-long-shot/ar-AAikDjp?OCID=ansmsnnews11

Wed 31 Aug 2016 04:31:54
Name :WRT
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I can't decide whether to ask the chicken or the egg for help with that one.
Sun 14 Aug 2016 10:12:01
Name :fOr YoU
Email :
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Unstoppable force vs immovable object. Which one wins? Unstoppable force vs immovable object. Think about it. Unstoppable force vs immovable object. What is the outcome? Unstoppable force vs immovable object. There has to be an answer. Unstoppable force vs immovable object. There is an answer. Unstoppable force vs immovable object. Think.
Wed 06 Jul 2016 09:43:32
Name :Tom McKay 1952
Email :Cancer Cure???
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If only. show me the actual facts. I would love to have a cure...too much $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ for that to happen. Have a happy
Mon 04 Jul 2016 01:48:13
Name :2HR CANCER 'FIX'
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Boffin discovers light can be used to destroy tumours in just two hours

He combined a single jab with ultraviolet light that causes cancerous cells to self destruct.
Cancer cells in lab mice were found to self-destruct, with up to 95 per cent dead in two hours.

Professor Matthew Gdovin revealed the cells — which he injected with the chemical compound nitrobenzaldehyde — turned too acidic to survive. He said after patenting his “photodynamic” therapy: “There are many different types of cancers.

“The one thing they have in common is their susceptibility to this induced cell suicide.

“We are thinking outside the box and finding a way to do what for many is simply impossible.” His lab tests showed amazing results against triple negative breast cancer — one of the most aggressive forms.

Just one treatment stopped tumours growing, doubling chances of survival.
Prof Gdovin, of the University of Texas at San Antonio, said that because the treatment is non-invasive it is ideal for hard to reach cancers such as in the spine or heart. It could also be used in patients unable to have more radiation therapy after undergoing the maximum safe amount.
US researchers are probing the use of proteins from anthrax to fight tumours. https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1385404/light-can-kill-cancer-in-just-two-hours/
Fri 01 Jul 2016 02:59:14
Name :tom mckay 52
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Hi happy July 4
Wed 29 Jun 2016 07:33:34
Name :Henry
Email :100 million birds
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Thousands of dinosaur-era bird fossils unearthed: Feathers perfectly preserved in amber are close to 100 million years old.

-Researchers discovered prehistoric feathers preserved in tree amber

-The 99 million-year-old fossils belong to the ancestors of modern birds

-Included are two tiny wings preserved in just a few cubic cm of amber

-They come from an extinct branch of birds called the enantiornithines


Wed 22 Jun 2016 01:03:26
Name :Beam me up, Scotty!
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Russia aims to develop 'teleportation' in 20 years

22 June 2016

It’s a question that physicists, philosophers, and science fiction writers have pondered for decades: how to travel from one place to another without travelling through the space in between.

Now a Kremlin-backed research program is seeking to make the teleportation technology behind Captain Kirk’s transporter a reality.

A proposed multi-trillion pound strategic development program drawn up for Vladimir Putin would seek to develop teleportation by 2035.

"It sounds fantastical today, but there have been successful experiments at Stanford at the molecular level," Alexander Galitsky, a prominent investor in the country's technology sector, told Russia's Kommersant daily on Wednesday. "Much of the tech we have today was drawn from science fiction films 20 years ago."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/22/russia-aims-to-develop-teleportation-in-20-years/


Tue 21 Jun 2016 08:15:08
Name :Tom 52
Email :The Heat is on. Not a happy
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110 Degrees Fahrenheit in Beverly Hills? Whoa horsefly, my world is changing way too fast. The good news: My wife Leticia took me out for dinner and a couple of bands, one a Mexican rock band and the other the 'We B fore' Classic Rock band.' Both were excellent but 'We B Fore' was superb. We danced more in three hours than we have in the past ten years. A great Father's day to say the least. Have a happy
Tue 21 Jun 2016 08:14:46
Name :Tom 52
Email :Te heat is on. Not a happy
Message
110 Degrees Fahrenheit in Beverly Hills? Whoa horsefly, my world is changing way too fast. The good news: My wife Leticia took me out for dinner and a couple of bands, one a Mexican rock band and the other the 'We B fore' Classic Rock band.' Both were excellent but 'We B Fore' was superb. We danced more in three hours than we have in the past ten years. A great Father's day to say the least. Have a happy
Thu 09 Jun 2016 07:48:33
Name :Tom McKay 1952
Email :Uh Oh is right and MORE
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Uh Oh, Check out Ampicillin combined with Clavulonate and get worried. Since 1984 this drug has led to serious liver damage and even a leading cause of death in senior citizens over 65. I nearly died from vomiting and diarrhea due to this menace two weeks ago. I went to the ER twice and was hospitalized for four more days. What BS and a sham that we are subject to so many damning bad meds. Not a happy
Wed 01 Jun 2016 02:54:06
Name :Uh-oh
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Research: Use Of Many Over-The-Counter Cold Medications Linked To Dementia...

Use of an antihistamine known as diphenhydramine, which is commonly sold as Benadryl, Tylenol PM, Advil PM, and ZZZQuil, and included in many over-the-counter medications for cold and allergies, may increase the risk of dementia and even cause irreparable harm.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2016/05/31/study-benadryl-dementia/
Sat 28 May 2016 10:55:38
Name :Tom 52
Email :ER Etc.
Message
Damn, Bad medical stuff lately. worried somewhat. Losing weight. Ouchy! Hank, loan me a few pounds. Have a happy
Fri 06 May 2016 10:58:33
Name :Tom McKay
Email :mckay_thomas@att.net
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Hot Diggity Dog, The Kentucky Derby is Tomorrow. I will have a happy
Tom
Thu 21 Apr 2016 10:41:20
Name :Tom 52
Email :Sugar On My Mind
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Gosh, I'm staying with real sugar. Yikes! Not a happy
Sat 12 Mar 2016 12:59:19
Name :Splenda linked to Leukemia
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Splenda linked to Leukemia, new study finds

One of the most popular sugar alternatives could lead to very dangerous side effects.

The artificial sweetener sucralose – which is found in the ubiquitous yellow packets of Splenda – is being linked to leukemia, according to a study published by the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health.

Mice that were fed sucralose daily for their entire lives developed leukemia and other blood cancers.

Here at Health Nut News we’ve talked extensively about the dangers of artificial sweeteners and how studies show they can make you fat, but now forget obesity- we’ve got cancer.

Nutrition watchdog group Center for Science in the Public Interest is formally recommending that consumers avoid sucralose. Artificial sweetener Splenda is sucralose-based.

It’s a big deal considering this is the same company that listed sucralose as a safe alternative to sugar prior to the new research findings.

Sucralose can be found in over 4,500 products,according to the study.

The sucralose case study was funded without special interests, unlike the majority of case studies for food additives.

For most food additives, the safety studies are conducted by the manufacturers who have financial incentives,” said Lisa Lefferts, senior scientist at the CSPI reports Eatclean.com.

Even if you don’t splurge on Splenda, you could still potentially see adverse effects.

“When something causes cancer at high doses, it generally causes cancer at lower doses, the risk is just smaller,” Lefferts said.

Skeptics of the new study are still being warned about the adverse effects of artificial sweeteners. New research shows artificial sweeteners cause weight gain, not weight loss, and diet soda can lead to an increase in belly fat, reports Eatclean.com.

http://www.healthnutnews.com/splenda-linked-to-leukemia-study-finds/
Tue 08 Mar 2016 11:24:34
Name :Tomorrow - Wednesday
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Total Solar eclipse, SuperMoon, and Asteroid TX68 whizzes by earth, all in a 24 hour period on March 9th.
Sun 07 Feb 2016 01:00:48
Name :Potato power
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(Sorry such a long post but since no one has posted in a while I figured it would be ok this time.)

Potato power: the spuds that could light the world

For the past few years, researcher Rabinowitch and colleagues have been pushing the idea of “potato power” to deliver energy to people cutoff from electricity grids. Hook up a spud to a couple of cheap metal plates, wires and LED bulbs, they argue, and it could provide lighting to remote towns and villages around the world.

They’ve also discovered a simple but ingenious trick to make potatoes particularly good at producing energy. “A single potato can power enough LED lamps for a room for 40 days,” claims Rabinowitch, who is based at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The idea may seem absurd, yet it is rooted in sound science. Still, Rabinowitch and his team have discovered that actually launching potato power in the real world is much more complex than it first appears.

While Rabinowitch and team have found a way to make potatoes produce more power than usual, the basic principles are taught in high school science classes, to demonstrate how batteries work.

To make a battery from organic material, all you need is two metals – an anode, which is the negative electrode, such as zinc, and a cathode, the positively charged electrode, such as copper. The acid inside the potato forms a chemical reaction with the zinc and copper, and when the electrons flow from one material to another, energy is released.

1This was discovered by Luigi Galvani in 1780 when he connected two metals to the legs of a frog, causing its muscles to twitch. But you can put many materials between these two electrodes to get the same effect. Alexander Volta, around the time of Galvani, used saltwater-soaked paper. Others have made “earth batteries” using two metal plates and a pile of dirt, or a bucket of water.

Super spuds

Potatoes are often the preferred vegetable of choice for teaching high school science students these principles. Yet to the surprise of Rabinowitch, no one had scientifically studied spuds as an energy source. So in 2010, he decided to give it a try, along with PhD student Alex Goldberg, and Boris Rubinsky of the University of California, Berkeley.

“We looked at 20 different types of potatoes,” explains Goldberg, “and we looked at their internal resistance, which allows us to understand how much energy was lost by heat.”

They found that by simply boiling the potatoes for eight minutes, it broke down the organic tissues inside the potatoes, reducing resistance and allowing for freer movement of electrons– thus producing more energy. They also increased the energy output by slicing the potato into four or five pieces, each sandwiched by a copper and zinc plate, to make a series. “We found we could improve the output 10 times, which made it interesting economically, because the cost of energy drops down,” says Goldberg.

“It’s low voltage energy,” says Rabinowitch, “but enough to construct a battery that could charge mobile phones or laptops in places where there is no grid, no power connection.”

Their cost analyses suggested that a single boiled potato battery with zinc and copper electrodes generates portable energy at an estimated $9 per kilowatt hour, which is 50-fold cheaper than a typical 1.5 volt AA alkaline cell or D cell battery, which can cost $49–84 per kilowatt hour. It’s also an estimated six times cheaper than standard kerosene lamps used in the developing world.

Which raises an important question – why isn’t the potato battery already a roaring success?

In 2010, the world produced a staggering 324,181,889 tonnes of potatoes. They are the world’s number one non-grain crop, in 130 countries, and a hefty source of starch for billions around the world. They are cheap, store easily, and last for a long time.

With 1.2 billion people in the world lacking access to electricity, a simple potato could be the answer– or so the researchers thought. “We thought organisations would be interested,” says Rabinowitch. “We thought politicians in India would give them out with their names inscribed on them. They cost less than a dollar.”

Soac4Yet three years on since their experiment, why haven’t governments, companies or organisations embraced potato batteries? “The simple answer is they don’t even know about it,” reasons Rabinowitch. But it may be more complicated than that.

First, there’s the issue of using a food for energy. Olivier Dubois, senior natural resources officer at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), says that using food for energy – like sugar cane for biofuels – must avoid depleting food stocks and competing with farmers.

“You first need to look at: are there enough potatoes to eat? Then, are we not competing with farmers making income from selling potatoes?” he explains. “So if eating potatoes is covered, selling potatoes is covered, and there’s some potatoes left, then yes, it can work”

In a country like Kenya, the potato is the second most important food for families after maize. Smallholder farmers produced around 10 million tonnes of potatoes this year, yet around 10-20% were lost in post-harvest waste due to lack of access to markets, poor storage conditions, and other issues, according to Elmar Schulte–Geldermann, potato science leader for sub–Saharan Africa at the International Potato Center in Nairobi, Kenya. The potatoes that don’t make it to the market could easily be turned into batteries.

Pithy answer

Yet in Sri Lanka, for instance, the locally available potatoes are rare and expensive. So a team of scientists at the University of Kelaniya recently decided to try the experiment with something more widely available, and free – plantain piths (stems).

Physicist KD Jayasuriya and his team found that the boiling technique produced a similar efficiency increase for plantains – and the best battery performance was obtained by chopping the plantain pith after boiling.

With the boiled piths, they found they could power a single LED for more than 500 hours, provided it is prevented from drying out. “I think the potato has slightly better current, but the plantain pith is free, it’s something we throw away,” says Jayasuriya.

Despite all this, some are sceptical of the feasibility of potato power. “In reality, the potato battery is essentially like a regular battery you’d buy at the store,” says Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. “It’s just using a different matrix.” While the potato helps to prevent energy being lost to heat, it is not the source of the energy – that’s actually extracted via the corrosion of the zinc. “It’s sacrificial – the metal is degrading over time,” says Lovley. This means you’d have to replace the zinc – and of course the potato or plantain pith – over time.

Still, zinc is quite cheap in most developing countries. And Jayasuriya argues that it could still be more cost effective than a kerosene lamp. A zinc electrode that lasts about five months would cost about the same as a litre of kerosene, which fuels the average family home in Sri Lanka for two days. You could also use other electrodes, like magnesium or iron.

But potato advocates must surmount another problem before their idea catches on: consumer perception of potatoes. Compared with modern technologies like solar power, potatoes are perhaps less desirable as an energy source.

Gaurav Manchanda, founder of One Degree Solar, which sells micro-solar home systems in Kenya, says people buy their products for more reasons than efficiency and price. “These are all consumers at the end of the day. They need to see the value in it, not only in terms of performance, but status,” he explains. Basically, some people might not want to show off their potato battery to impress a neighbor.

Still, it cannot be denied that the potato battery idea works, and it appears cheap. Advocates of potato power will no doubt continue to keep chipping away.

http://www.allselfsustained.com/potato-power-the-spuds-that-could-light-the-world/
Fri 08 Jan 2016 07:56:08
Name :Tom McKay
Email :2016
Message
A belated happy and prosperous New Year 2016 to all Mariners, Have a happy