TRIVIA BOARD

GAME RULES:
1) Use only one "handle" (name).
2) you can post as often as you like.
3) First one to answer wins a point.

4) First one to answer correctly asks the next trivia question.
5) If no winner is identified or answer is posted within 24 hrs or the winner declines to post a question then anybody can post.

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Fri 29 Jan 2016 03:50:46
Name :WRT
Category :Nuther '62er/The Police
Message
I'm laughing my ass off! No, it isn't either of those!
Wed 26 Oct 2022 11:20:20
Name :64
Category :
Message
It took awhile. But how about "Abigail Beecher" my English teacher!!
Fri 29 Jan 2016 02:35:47
Name :Nuther '62er
Category :
Message
"It's a Smull World."
Thu 28 Jan 2016 09:38:41
Name :The Police
Category :
Message

'Don't Stand So Close To Me' by The Police?
Thu 28 Jan 2016 05:21:10
Name :WRT
Category :
Message
This hit song was about a teacher. But, not the one at Mar Vista.
Tue 26 Jan 2016 07:52:32
Name :I like it, I like it!
Category :
Message

My favorite has to be 'Saloon'.

Think about the possibilities:

'The Mar Vista Saloon"

or

'The Heathen High Saloon'

Our motto could be:

"Where all The Heathens drink!"

Tue 26 Jan 2016 06:25:11
Name :TAVERN INN BAR PUB SALOON
Category :
Message

13th century - “Tavern” is one of the older of the terms, and first appeared in English in the 13th century meaning “a place where wine is sold to the public.” English had borrowed “tavern” from the Old French “taverne,” which in turn was derived from the Latin “taberna,” meaning “a shed constructed of boards, a hut, workshop.” That “taberna,” by the way, eventually also gave us the English word “tabernacle,” which is a definite step up from “hut.” Today “tavern” is exclusively used to mean “drinking establishment,” and, at least in the US, “tavern” has a somewhat more refined connotation than “bar.”

14th century - “Inn” comes from the Old English “inn,” probably related to our preposition “in,” and originally meant simply “house.” By the 14th century, “inn” meant “lodging house,” usually offering drinks as well. Today many places with “Inn” in their names are merely bars putting on airs

16th century - “Bar,” perhaps the most basic term for such places, dates to the late 16th century and comes from the barrier or counter over which drinks are served. This is the same “bar” as in common use meaning “long rod or barrier” and comes from the Latin “barra,” meaning “barrier.” A similar railing or bar separates lawyers, et al., from the public in courtrooms, and aspiring lawyers must pass a “bar exam” to join their ilk.

17th century - “Pub” is simply short for “public house” (dating to the early 17th century), an establishment that is licensed to sell alcohol to be consumed on the premises by the public (as opposed to private clubs, etc.). In the US, “pubs” ordinarily also serve food.

18th century - “Saloon” (early 18th century) is an Anglicized form of the French “salon,” originally meaning a large reception room or hall, often in a hotel. That “big room” meaning has been carried over into “saloon” used to denote private railroad cars, large automobiles, or deluxe cabins on ocean liners. “Saloon” meaning “place for drinking” dates to the mid-19th century. “Saloon” does imply a larger establishment than a simple “bar,” but the words are otherwise interchangeable.

As to why “tavern” and “inn” sound cozy to us, but “bar” seems seedy and “saloon” reeks of cowboys and breaking chairs, we can probably thank Hollywood. All these terms are essentially synonymous.
Tue 26 Jan 2016 06:06:12
Name :WRT
Category :fyi trivia
Message
They thought beer was essential for good health in those days. Not unlike me now.
Tue 26 Jan 2016 04:24:05
Name :fyi trivia
Category :
Message
The first Europeans to land in North America were deeply into drinking. There was said to be more beer aboard the Mayflower than there was drinking water, even the Puritans loved a good snootful, and, according to the official Colonial Williamsburg website, folks there were hammered pretty much 24/7. Who knew?
Sat 23 Jan 2016 10:17:03
Name :Gazillion dollars
Category :
Message
There ain't no gazillion, it's right up there with zillion, bijillion, and uncountabillion, a made-up term.

Just so you know, here's the list of "named illions":

Billion has 9 zeros

Trillion has 12 zeros

Quadrillion has 15 zeros

Quintillion has 18 zeros

Sextillion has 21 zeros

Septillion has 24 zeros

Octillion has 27 zeros

Nonillion has 30 zeros

Decillion has 33 zeros

Undecillion has 36 zeros

Duodecillion has 39 zeros

Tredecillion has 42 zeros

Quattuordecillion has 45 zeros

Quindecillion has 48 zeros

Sexdecillion has 51 zeros

Septendecillion has 54 zeros

Octodecillion has 57 zeros

Novemdecillion has 60 zeros

Vigintillion has 63 zeros

Googol has 100 zeros.

Centillion has 303 zeros (except in Britain, where it has 600 zeros)

Googolplex has a googol of zeros

Sat 09 Jan 2016 07:24:59
Name :WRT
Category :Nuther '62er
Message
I only know that song from the cartoon. I first saw it in the 80's. Tom the cat was paying his dues beside a stand up bass.

You can see it at...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-sLX5UZaxk
Fri 08 Jan 2016 03:34:17
Name :Nuther '62er
Category :WRT
Message
Now THAT'S an oldie WRT. That goes back to the 40's.
Thu 07 Jan 2016 05:36:56
Name :WRT
Category :
Message
I thought the song might be "Is you is or is you ain't my baby?".
Thu 07 Jan 2016 05:24:10
Name :Sn
Category :Nuther 62er
Message
You got it
Thu 07 Jan 2016 03:30:02
Name :Nuther '62er
Category :
Message
Wait a minute, I remember this. Tom & Jerry became......Simon & Garfunkle. I'm not sure of the song, maybe "Sounds of Silence'?
Wed 06 Jan 2016 01:48:10
Name :Sn
Category :
Message
Here's a hint 50 years ago this week they had the number one song
Wed 06 Jan 2016 05:36:09
Name :Sn
Category :WRT
Message
Not sure, but not who I'm thinking about
Wed 06 Jan 2016 04:30:37
Name :WRT
Category :
Message
Was one of the Grateful Dead named Tom?
Wed 06 Jan 2016 03:49:49
Name :Sn
Category :Nuther 62er
Message
Not the cat and mouse a music duo
Wed 06 Jan 2016 02:39:32
Name :Nuther '62er
Category :
Message
You can't mean the Cat & Mouse?
Tue 05 Jan 2016 07:12:01
Name :Sn
Category :
Message
Who were Tom & Jerry
Tue 05 Jan 2016 05:52:15
Name :WRT
Category :Sn
Message
You got it! Wow! I thought it would gather some moss before anyone answered it. Good job!
Tue 05 Jan 2016 12:03:03
Name :Sn
Category :
Message
Was it basketball jones. By cheech and chong
Tue 05 Jan 2016 04:47:11
Name :WRT
Category :
Message
What song on a hit comedy album of the early 70's featured George Harrison, Carole King, Tom Scott, Billy Preston, Ronnie Spector, and Michelle Phillips (of The Mamas and The Papas)? The song actually became a top twenty hit on its own.
Mon 04 Jan 2016 04:41:31
Name :WRT
Category :Nuther '62er
Message
Inspired by Yul Brenner's character or title, instead of his "costume", would have been helpful! I was thinking The Tunics or The Loincloths!
Mon 04 Jan 2016 05:50:59
Name :Nuther '62er
Category :
Message
I'm certainly not smart enough to have known this one. I came across it reading a mag in an airport. The song was NEVER a No.#1, but it was the No.#1 single of the year according to Billboard. I can't think of a hint that wouldn't give it away, so I'll just name it. In the 10 Commandments Yul Brynner was the King of Egypt, or if you prefer the Pharaoh. That should certainly give it away. Sam "The Sham" and the Pharaohs, and Wooly Bully.
Sun 03 Jan 2016 12:57:17
Name :WRT
Category :
Message
You got me stumped, AND I'm still hung over!
Sun 03 Jan 2016 05:17:07
Name :Nuther '62er
Category :
Message
No guesses yet? Or is everyone still hung over.